Tuesday, November 3, 2009

The Three Faces of Jacob's Coat and Some Very Confused Bees

My picture taking abilities (or lack thereof) don't do justice to the lovely color of Jacobs Coat. I guess I could blame the camera--yeah, that's it--if I only had a better camera...




As a bud, it is yellow edged in a Tangerine Orange.

It turns to an orange blossom with a buttery yellow center.

Lastly, it becomes a pink blossom with white at the heart.


I'm not quite sure what these bees are doing. Are they tanking up before frost? Are they confused, thinking they are hummingbirds?



The feeder is right outside the back door, and there are so many bees buzzing about, I am afraid to let Loudon out until they settle down. They have been working on the feeder for two days now.


















32 comments:

Cheryl said...

Hi Morning Glory.....beautiful bloom.....I love it when flowers change colour....

The bees seem hungry.....perhaps the sweet fluid is easier to take......

GrandmaK said...

Really beautiful ROSE!!! Very nice blog! Thank you! Cathy

Roses and Lilacs said...

I've never grown Jacob's Coat but have seen it in other gardens. Lovely with all the different colors.

All those bees will probably drive the hummers away.
Marnie

Rose said...

Beautiful rose, MG! The bees are probably enjoying the sweet nectar in the feeder as much as the hummingbirds would. My problem is always with ants trying to get into the feeders.

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Cheryl,

The rose seems to really enjoy our fall weather, it is putting out buds like crazy. I bought it because it changed colors and I liked the name (and it was on sale!).

I've never seen the bees swarm the feeders like this before. I am wondering what it means...a sign of a colder than normal winter, perhaps?

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Cathy,

Thanks for your kind words, and stopping by today.

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Marnie,

I was only getting one hummer every day or so...usually on their way to Mexico, I imagine. But the bees have certainly put a stop to any hummingbirds visiting. I moved the feeder...if we get any more swarms, at least it will be away from the patio where the grandkids like to play.

I have really enjoyed Jacob's Coat with it's changing colors. It has such a beautiful bud, and as it matures it looks like it has a light from within--it just glows. I would never have bought it, but it was on the sale table, and I am a sucker for a sale. ;-)

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Thanks Rose, my pictures just don't do justice to how beautiful Jacob's Coat is.

I have never seen the bees swarm the feeder like they have been. My first thought was Africanized bees, but they are not aggressive toward us. Even though one of the dogs got stung, it was her fault, and only by one--they didn't try to swarm on her.

Monica the Garden Faerie said...

I do think it's cool how rose colors change over the lifespan of the bud/flower. But sometimes the brain is slow... I was thinking of Joseph's coat and not getting how it had turned into a rose at all--HA!

Nola @ the Alamo said...

Beautiful rose; I love them, but don't have much luck. I have one rose that my aunt gave to me, already potted; I don't dare mess with it.
As usual, I'm looking beyond the subject of the photo! Is that a HUGE clump of rosemary behind the bees? Wow, it is spectacular!

Queenmothermamaw said...

Good morning Glory, I love the rose and we have had bees on our hummers feeding station all summer. Mostly when the hummers didn't seem to be interested. Maybe the bees scared them away. For my birthday month I am highlighting my followes daily. You came up for today. I enjoy your blog but noticed I hadn't visited for awhile. I would ask, as a gift from you, to just comment on something you are grateful for. blessings
QMM

Cindy, My Corner of Katy said...

MG, that's a gorgeous rose! I think the name might be Joseph's Coat, though? Jacob's the one with the ladder, isn't he? I hope the bees give the hummers a chance to fuel up!

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Cindy,

Oh my goodness! My bad! You are so right, it is Joseph, not Jacob. Thanks for catching that, or I might never have caught that mistake myself. Hey! It was one of those "J"'s from the Old Testament. Jacob-Joseph, it's all the same. I am one of those mother's (and now grandmother's) that has to go down the list of kids before I get to the right one. I guess it's the same for Biblical characters too. Ha!

Gail said...

They must be hungry as Cheryl says...I've seen them stop for water when really thirsty. gail

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Monica, You caught my faux pas too. Boy is my face red! I'd say your brain is more agile than mine! Joseph's Coat...not Jacob is a beauty of a climbing rose, unfortunately, no fragrance.

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Nola,

Yes, that is a rosemary behind the hummingbird feeder. One thing I can grow is rosemary--my mother is so envious because she hasn't been able to get it to grow. I think our growing conditions are perfect for it here--I bet you would have good luck with it too.

ShySongbird said...

Dear Jenny what a lovely bloom! With all the different stages it is almost like having three different roses, it is so pretty and I think you photographed it very well.

I enlarged the Hummingbird feeder photo (Oh how I would love to have Hummingbirds over here!) and those bees were really having a feast!

It is very autumnal over here now so I don't think we will be seeing any bees until the Spring.

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Dear Shy Songbird,

Thank you for the lovely comments about my picture taking abilities. Even though I make fun, it has improved immensely since I have started my blog.

Joseph's Coat, which I erroneously called "Jacob's Coat" in my haste, truly is like having three different rose bushes in one. I love to check on it every day to see how much the blossoms have changed.

The bees are still very busy with the feeder, but I have moved it to a less populated area of the garden. I imagine when they polish off the nectar, I will refill it for them. I may have to start calling it the honey bee feeder.
;-)

Trubes said...

Hello MG,
Lovely pictures, I just love roses, I can still smell the fragrance of the beautiful pale pink roses my parents grew, when I was a child.
This is my first visit to your site, I have enjoyed reading it.
I see that you are a Beatles fan...
I have recently written two blogs about them on my site.
You may enjoy them,

Warm Regards fromm sunny Liverpool!

Di.

Corner Gardener Sue said...

That is a pretty rose. And, look at all those bees! I should put our hummingbird feeder out for the bees. LOL We don't often see hummers around here.

Thanks for your comment on my bloom post. I was surprised about the lantana, too, as all the other lantanas I had did die. The leaves were a bit different than the other plants I had, so maybe it's a hardier variety.

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Hello Trubes, and welcome! Thanks for stopping by. I read your posts with great interest, and they brought back memories of all the crazy dances we had "back in the day". I feel so old! LOL!

Roses are beautiful, but then I never met a flower I didn't like.

Wendy said...

That is one beautiful rose! In all her colours. Nice shots. So you still have your feeders up? Ours are long gone. I guess those bees know a good thing when the smell it. LOL!

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Sue,

Yes, I have decided to call it the Honey Bee Feeder! At least until next Spring when the Hummers take it back over.

It would be interesting to do a little detective work on that Lantana, and find out if it is a different type than most. I could probably have it year round here, since it has survived a snow fall and some frost in your garden.

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Wendy,

Even though all the hummers that were raised in our yard have gone for the winter, I will get a hummer of two a day coming through on their journey. I have kept the feeders up for them, but the bees have decided they need the nectar.

The Redneck Rosarian said...

beautiful roses. found your site from blotanical......

fairegarden said...

Ah, good to see the name thing has been cleared up, I thought it looked just like the rose, Joseph's Coat too. Jacob, Joseph, details details. Still a beauty. As for the bees, we had wasps at the hummingbird feeders that would chase the hummers away, having a battle mid air right outside my window. It looked like the birds were afraid of the insects too. I didn't know what to do, other than let nature take its course. The feeder is down now for the winter. It was disturbing to watch the wasp chase the bird from the food that was put out for it. Like the squirrels eating the seeds from the bird feeders. Sigh.
Frances

Dee/reddirtramblings said...

I think the bees are stocking up. It's like a rest stop for them. Happy fall.~~Dee

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Welcome, Redneck Rosarian! I am glad you found my little blog. I will be sure to visit you and explore your blog.

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Hi Frances, I am glad that someone's sharp eyes caught my blunder. I was never a detail person, and even when I proofread, I seem to read what I want to see rather than what is actually there! LOL! I need to take down my Hummingbird feeders now...I haven't seen a hummer in quite awhile. It is upsetting to see the wasps chase away the hummers. I have been wondering about a wasp and bee trap--they don't really trap them, it is just supposed to lure them away from the feeders. I may try one next season if I brave the outdoors once again...

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

I think you are right, Dee. They are tanking up for the winter. I wonder if that means we are going to have a long cold winter.

The Glasers said...

Bee-autiful flowers!

Bees and ants seem to like our hummingbird feeder . . . I guess nectar is nectar to the insects!

Morning Glories in Round Rock said...

Hello Glasers, and welcome! Yes, you are right, nectar is nectar to bees as well as hummers. I have been trying to attach some sort of meaning to the large numbers of honey bees on the feeders, but think they just know a good thing when they smell it.